Hillary Clinton, of all people, summed up this debate and this election best.

“What kind of country are we going to be?”

The Evita of Arkansas is a compulsive liar who has never told the truth in her life. But this time around she was right. This election does not come down to the personalities. It comes down to the kind of country we are going to have. And in the third debate, the one that took a break from the petty haranguing of media lackeys like Lester Holt and Martha Raddatz, the issues took center stage.

Media's Trump Derangement Syndrome Incites Violence

The media's crusade to elect Hillary Clinton president is obvious. They deny their bias — they truly protesteth too much — but it's there and it's been confirmed by leaked emails.

But this election year, the bias is more than favoritism for the Democratic candidate. The media are going to great lengths to instigate a public hatred toward the Republican candidate.

Hillary campaign manager: 'I know she has begun to hate everyday Americans'

There long has been evidence of Hillary Clinton’s sense of entitlement – the stories of her ordering Secret Service officers to carry her bags, her unabashed demands for hundreds of thousands of dollars for speeches, her insistence on specific travel accommodations and much more.

Now there’s evidence of exactly what she thinks of the average American who works hard and pays taxes to support the Washington establishment.

Not much.

“I know she has begun to hate everyday Americans,” wrote her campaign manager, John Podesta, in an email.


Survey Finds High Support For Communism Among Millennials

Oddly, an entire generation that embraced “The Hunger Games” (and its anti-socialism themes) with gusto is going ga-ga for an ideology that would have everyone living like Katniss Everdeen’s impoverished District 12. No, socialism and the millennials who love it will bring on the Hunger Games, but in reverse, and the odds are not in anybody’s favor.


The nation of Hungary recently did something that is as unprecedented as it is commonsensical and humanitarian: it “has become the first government to open an office specifically to address the persecution of Christians in the Middle East and Europe.”  

Zoltan Balog, Hungary’s Minister for Human Resources, explained:

Today, Christianity has become the most persecuted religion, where out of five people killed [for] religious reasons, four of them are Christians.  In 81 countries around the world, Christians are persecuted, and 200 million Christians live in areas where they are discriminated against. Millions of Christian lives are threatened by followers of radical religious ideologies.