Georgia State U's 'Oral Sex' Experts Anger Lawmaker: Tax Dollars Should Not Be Paying for This

Best education your tax dollars can buy. Professors in ORAL SEX, what a waste of money time and resources. Dont send your kids here! GSU Alumni, WHERE ARE YOU? Web News The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

A powerful state lawmaker believes Georgia’s university system must not be too bad off financially if it can afford to employ experts in oral sex, male prostitution and “queer theory.”

Rep. Calvin Hill (R-Canton) said the university system has resisted accepting the budget cuts that nearly every other part of state government has absorbed as lawmakers fill a $2 billion hole in the budget. But, meanwhile, he said, Georgia State University is touting its faculty as experts on issues that are outside what he believes to be the university’s mission.

“I’m saying we all need to pull together and when we have things that are extraneous and outrages, which I don’t think should be discussed with our tax dollars, maybe some of this will come to mind when we have to make budget cuts,” said Hill, vice chairman of the House Appropriations Committee.

Georgia State, like most colleges and universities, produces an annual guide to its faculty experts. These are professors, instructors, lecturers or administrators with demonstrated expertise in their particular field. The guide is used by journalists, public policy organizations and governments to find information or experts.

Georgia State’s 2009 experts guide identifies Jack Boozer, professor of communications, as an expert on “queer theory,” senior sociology lecturer Mindy Stombler as an expert in oral sex, and faculty member Kirk Elifson as an expert in male prostitution.

“All colleges and universities have faculty with a wide and deep range of expertise related to specific disciplines,” said John Millsaps, spokesman for the Georgia Board of Regents.

Some areas of expertise are technical, political or scientific, Millsaps said, “some may be mundane, others may cover controversial subjects. All require individuals who meet the accepted standards and requirements within their respective fields in order that public policy and decisions can be made based upon solid research and knowledge.”

Hill at first was under the impression that the experts guide was a course listing, but Georgia State does not offer classes in those subjects.

Stombler’s work on oral sex has social value, said GSU spokeswoman Andrea Jones. Stombler could not be reached for comment.

Stombler, Jones said, “has conducted research to better understand the cultural messages surrounding oral sex and their connection to an increase of such activities among teenagers. This research helps public health officials make policy to deal with this increase.”

Hill said he has no plans to introduce legislation dealing with the issue. He said he just wants “people to find out exactly what their taxes are paying for.”

“I’m personally outraged that our taxpayer money is supporting professors, that this is what they’re offering as their services,” Hill said. “I don’t’ think we need that at a public university. That’s a waste of our money.”

A powerful state lawmaker believes Georgia’s university system must not be too bad off financially if it can afford to employ experts in oral sex, male prostitution and “queer theory.”

Rep. Calvin Hill (R-Canton) said the university system has resisted accepting the budget cuts that nearly every other part of state government has absorbed as lawmakers fill a $2 billion hole in the budget. But, meanwhile, he said, Georgia State University is touting its faculty as experts on issues that are outside what he believes to be the university’s mission.

“I’m saying we all need to pull together and when we have things that are extraneous and outrages, which I don’t think should be discussed with our tax dollars, maybe some of this will come to mind when we have to make budget cuts,” said Hill, vice chairman of the House Appropriations Committee.

Georgia State, like most colleges and universities, produces an annual guide to its faculty experts. These are professors, instructors, lecturers or administrators with demonstrated expertise in their particular field. The guide is used by journalists, public policy organizations and governments to find information or experts.

Georgia State’s 2009 experts guide identifies Jack Boozer, professor of communications, as an expert on “queer theory,” senior sociology lecturer Mindy Stombler as an expert in oral sex, and faculty member Kirk Elifson as an expert in male prostitution.

“All colleges and universities have faculty with a wide and deep range of expertise related to specific disciplines,” said John Millsaps, spokesman for the Georgia Board of Regents.

Some areas of expertise are technical, political or scientific, Millsaps said, “some may be mundane, others may cover controversial subjects. All require individuals who meet the accepted standards and requirements within their respective fields in order that public policy and decisions can be made based upon solid research and knowledge.”

Hill at first was under the impression that the experts guide was a course listing, but Georgia State does not offer classes in those subjects.

Stombler’s work on oral sex has social value, said GSU spokeswoman Andrea Jones. Stombler could not be reached for comment.

Stombler, Jones said, “has conducted research to better understand the cultural messages surrounding oral sex and their connection to an increase of such activities among teenagers. This research helps public health officials make policy to deal with this increase.”

Hill said he has no plans to introduce legislation dealing with the issue. He said he just wants “people to find out exactly what their taxes are paying for.”

“I’m personally outraged that our taxpayer money is supporting professors, that this is what they’re offering as their services,” Hill said. “I don’t’ think we need that at a public university. That’s a waste of our money.”

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