Chuck Norris: Enemies within

Posted: November 08, 20099:14 pm Eastern

© 2009

Last Thursday, Nov. 5, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, an Army psychiatrist and devout Muslim, fatally shot 13 U.S. American citizens (12 service men and women) and wounded an additional 30 people at the largest U.S. military installation, Fort Hood, Texas.

Faizul Khan, a former imam who attended services at the same mosque with Hasan for 10 years in Silver Spring, Md., described him as "very serious about his religion" and wanting an equally religious woman "who prayed five times a day and wears a hijab."

Hasan vehemently opposed the U.S. missions in the Middle East, arguing with co-workers, senior officers and even patients. He quarreled with Col. Terry Lee, who testified that Hasan "said maybe the Muslims should stand up and fight against the aggressor." Dr. Val Finnell, a former classmate, said that Hasan was "very vocal" about equating the war on terror with a war on Islam. He said Hasan even gave a PowerPoint presentation once justifying Islamic suicide bombing.

A few days before Hasan's killing spree at Fort Hood, he proved his premeditated intentions by giving away all his belongings (including his Qurans) to his neighbors, saying he would no longer need them and adding "I'm ready."

Just hours before the shooting spree, he attended prayer services at a local mosque, where he normally wore street clothes but that morning wore white Muslim attire.

Firsthand witnesses at the Fort Hood murder scene heard Hasan yelling, "Allahu akbar" (meaning "God is great") before he opened fire killing 13 and wounding 30 more.

For six months, authorities had been tracking the extremist thinking of Hasan. Internet postings like this one go back to May 20, 2009 (spelling as in original):

There was a grenade thrown amongs a group of American soldiers. One of the soldiers, feeling that it was to late for everyone to flee jumped on the grave with the intention of saving his comrades. Indeed he saved them. He inentionally took his life (suicide) for a noble cause i.e. saving the lives of his soldier. To say that this soldier committed suicide is inappropriate. Its more appropriate to say he is a brave hero that sacrificed his life for a more noble cause. Scholars have paralled this to suicide bombers whose intention, by sacrificing their lives, is to help save Muslims by killing enemy soldiers. If one suicide bomber can kill 100 enemy soldiers because they were caught off guard that would be considered a strategic victory. Their intention is not to die because of some despair. The same can be said for the Kamikazees in Japan. They died (via crashing their planes into ships) to kill the enemies for the homeland. You can call them crazy i you want but their act was not one of suicide that is despised by Islam. So the scholars main point is that 'IT SEEMS AS THOUGH YOUR INTENTION IS THE MAIN ISSUE' and Allah (SWT) knows best. (Note: An interesting resource next to Hasan's posting is for the resource "Martyrdom in Islam Versus Suicide Bombing.") And the one question that keeps coming to my mind is: Have we become so tolerant and politically correct that we can't see or confront a rotten apple when it's right in front of our eyes?

To those roughly 3,500 Muslims who faithfully serve in the U.S. military, God bless you. We appreciate what you do and pray for you along with all of our dedicated service men and women. I fully realize Muslim extremists don't represent mainstream Islam. We must not quarantine all Islamic theology and practice as un-American.

At the same time, we must not stick our heads in the religious sands and call all these fatal acts "isolated incidents." We should not ignore the systemic nature and embryonic potential of fanaticism inherent within many. And we must not allow our cultural infatuation with passivity and tolerance to restrain us from searching for and stopping such militant rudimentary resistance, especially on our military posts.