Latest assault on Christmas by liberal elite: Sexualized version of "Nutcracker", including transsexuality and sado-masochism, praised by Boston media.

Massresistance Update This is one of those things that helps you understand the mainstream Boston media's complete distain for traditional values and the pro-family movement. They look at the world a LOT differently than we (or most people) do . . .

There's something magical every year about "The Nutcracker" ballet performance at Christmas time, whether you're a child or an adult. It has had a very special place in Boston tradition (and elsewhere of course) for generations.

Now there's some competition in town. Somebody has concocted an erotic parody version of the Nutcracker called "Slutcracker," with transgender, sado-masochistic and general pornographic themes celebrating "the carefree realm of sexual fantasy." It's playing at the Somerville Theater this month. It's not something you'd normally think would attract attention, especially positive attention.

Just a fun night out?

Not only is it being widely publicized, but the "mainstream" media in Boston didn't give "Slutcracker" any bad reviews. They all seem to think that it is a pretty good show and worth seeing, although for adults only.

By reading their reviews, you'd think it was a fun adult night out. (For them, maybe it is!)

"Destined to be a holiday classic. But I wouldn't take my kids to it." - Fox 25 News Boston

". . . a holiday burlesque show . . . It's definitely only for viewers 18 and older." - Boston Globe

"Sexy, freaky, holiday, zeitgeist spectacular" - Boston Herald

"Bringing Burlesque back to Boston, The Slutcracker dance-theater production features can-can dancers, drag kings, hoopers, ballerinas, acrobats, belly dancers, and more. . ." - Boston Magazine

Unfortunately, the Globe, Herald, and the others only hint at how raunchy this really is. Let's look a little closer.

Weird, bizarre, offensive . . . and worse

The question quickly becomes: Why would any legitimate newspaper or TV station give this a serious review?

In "The Nutcracker" there's a giant Christmas tree. In "Slutcracker" people dance around a giant penis on stage. The "Nutcracker" has sugar plum fairies and mouse soldiers. "Slutcracker" stars a troupe of strippers, a transsexual male-to-female stripper, and one photo shows a female lead dressed in BDSM-style skimpy black leather carrying a big whip. And it goes on from there.

The Boston "alternative media" likes it. And unlike the "mainstream" media, they aren't afraid to describe it. As one "alternative" review put it:

. . . a sundry coalition of burlesque performers, drag kings, can-can dancers, hoola-hoopists, and more will put up a very special retelling of E.T.A. Hoffman's classic story. And by "very special," we mean with dildos and nipple tassels. In this version, our young dreamer Clara finds a sex toy waiting for her under the Christmas tree. It leads her to a kinky-freaky-sexy land where she discovers . . . the true meaning of Christmas? Something like that, anyway.

Another review describes:

Whereas The Nutcracker turns a phallic symbol into a real man, who then shows its adolescent girl lead a good time, it's much the same with The Slutcracker. Except this phallus is a real d-ck. Well, a vibrator, given to Clara (played for once as an adult, by an adult) as a gift from her batty grandmother, played by Mary Dolan, who herself is a stage character (I hope) of supremely bizarre appeal. The first act closes with Clara getting roundly rogered by her new toy.

The Boston Phoenix simply says:

. . . this is some next-level sh-t . . . it's an extraordinarily well-plotted, scene-by-scene, song-by-song retelling of The Nutcracker. If you're familiar with the Boston Ballet version you'll get more of the in-jokes, and everyone else can concentrate on enjoying larger-than-life candystriped dildos and pole-dancing sugar plum fairies.

An interesting view of how people in the mainstream media think

One can always speculate on the kinds of people who would create something like this -- or pay money to sit and watch it. There's likely a market somewhere for just about anything.

But we think that the average person above the age of adolescence would find a dance production that centers around a giant penis to be weird, juvenile, or even a little sick. But not the people writing for the Boston "mainstream media" who fawn over it as a legitimate work of Christmas art.

Can we trust anything else they write about?