Chuck Norris: Away With the Manger I'm willing to bet that President Barack Obama's Christmas address this week will shine with a religious significance that's about as bright as what was in his unusually short Thanksgiving proclamation, which gave a token reference to God via a quote from George Washington.

Even in the Obamas' superstar Christmas interviews with Oprah Winfrey and Gloria Estefan, there were discussions about Santa Claus, Christmas trees, ornaments, gingerbread houses and even their dog's Christmas stocking. Obama even gave a Christmas shout-out to all Hispanics. But there was not one mention of religion or a hint of the real reason

Gone are the days when presidents and most politicians publicly rejoiced in the birth of Christ. Like many of you, I still remember a day -- even in Washington -- when Christ was central to Christmas. It was an America that was far less politically correct, an America that wasn't afraid to stand up for its belief in the babe who was born in Bethlehem.

Besides Obama, even our modern Democratic presidents have stood up for America's Judeo-Christian heritage and the true meaning of Christmas. Here's a small sample. (If you're interested in more, I encourage you to go to the exclusive expanded edition of this same article at WorldNetDaily, which documents more than a dozen of our other presidents' Christmas confessions and festivities, from George Washington through George W. Bush.)

It's well-known that President John Kennedy was a Catholic. What's not so well-known is that in 1957, then-Sen. Kennedy disclosed at a National Conference of Christians and Jews dinner what he believed was the remedy to the ills in society: "Upon what can we rely? Where can we compete? In what can we find hope for the future? The answer, I believe, lies ultimately in the very principles which we honor tonight -- the principles of our Judaic-Christian heritage."

President Lyndon B. Johnson publicly declared on Dec. 22, 1963: "We were taught by him whose birth we commemorate that after death, there is life. ... In these last 200 years, we have guided the building of our nation and our society by those principles and precepts brought to earth nearly 2,000 years ago on that first Christmas."

President Jimmy Carter spoke to the nation Dec. 15, 1977: "Christmas has a special meaning for those of us who ... know that almost 2,000 years ago, the Son of Peace was born to give us a vision of perfection, a vision of humility, a vision of unselfishness, a vision of compassion, a vision of love."

President Bill Clinton addressed the nation Dec. 21, 1999, with these words: "St. Matthew's Gospel tells us that on the first Christmas 2,000 years ago, a bright star shone vividly in the eastern sky, heralding the birth of Jesus and the beginning of his hallowed mission as teacher, healer, servant and savior."

Will President Obama's Christmas address rival those Christian confessions of past presidents? Will it even reflect them at all? Or will his yuletide cheer be another politically correct concoction, adding to the ones that already have adorned the first year of his presidency? Continued...