Kool-Aid Day

Rightwing NewsVan Helsing

November 18 is the anniversary of the Jonestown Massacre, the day in 1978 that moonbats began their time-honored tradition of guzzling Kool-Aid. In Guyana, they did it on behalf of communist cult leader Jim Jones, who was too cowardly to drink the cyanide-laced drink himself and had to be shot by one of his henchmen. His wife left instructions for the money they milked from their gullible slaves to be donated to the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Typically, the Jonestown Massacre has been spun by our liberal ruling class as some sort of religious episode. This is because Jones and his followers worshiped the same thing liberals do: coercive collectivism. As Original Dissent commented,

Our media have concealed, misrepresented, or downplayed the key element in the philosophy of Jim Jones. He was a long-time dedicated Marxist communist who admired totalitarian communist dictatorships such as the Soviet Union and Cuba so much that he built one of his own in Guyana. It was tiny, with fewer than 1,000 inhabitants, but it had many striking resemblances to the dictatorships it was modeled after. The inhabitants were not free to leave Jonestown. Those who tried to escape were severely punished. Family members were kept in Jonestown as hostages to enable the dictator to exert control over those who were on the outside. The inhabitants were cut off from free communication with the outside world. The news they got was filtered through the dictator. They were subjected to the constant blare of exhortations and instructions by loudspeaker, one of the techniques of the Chinese communists. They were forced to attend lengthy meetings, listening to the political harrangues of Jones, after having worked ten to twelve hours in the fields. This is another technique of the Chinese communists. They were trained in what to say to visitors and were as adept as the Chinese, and Soviets in pulling on a good show and concealing the harsh reality. They were not permitted to own any substantial personal property, making them totally dependent on the dictator for their subsistence and survival. They were in mortal fear of the dictator's armed guards and "hit squads," which they believed would track them down and murder them if they should leave. They were punished if they complained about food or living conditions, and they were afraid to express dissatisfaction even privately. There was no religious observance in the community, apart from the obeisance to the all-powerful dictator, Jones. The workers were poorly fed, poorly housed and overworked, while the dictator lived in luxury.

Read More: http://rightwingnews.com/2010/11/kool-aid-day/