Atheists launch anti-Christian ad campaign

Posted: December 02, 20101:00 am Eastern

By Brad O'Leary © 2010

The American Humanist Association is clearly more hungry for attention than it is for disciples of atheism. Just in time for Christmas, the group is in the midst of a six-figure television, print and Internet ad campaign it says is designed to get people to "consider humanism," which is an atheistic "faith" in science and man's ability to reason. The campaign, however, is short on reason.

The vast majority of AHA's ad campaign is being underwritten with a six-figure donation by Todd Stiefel, a retired pharmaceutical company executive.

The campaign is an attack on Christianity that juxtaposes quotes from Old and New Testament books of the Bible with quotes from famous non-believers. For example, the AHA cherry-picks a particularly barbaric Old Testament verse (avoiding any context or scholarly explanation, of course) and then puts it next to a quote from an atheist calling for global governance.

This isn't exactly the stuff of big thinkers, and one wonders if this is really the best that a movement centered on worship of the human mind can do.

But the campaign's ineffectiveness aside, the timing of the effort does tell us something about the atheist and humanist movement – specifically, it detests Christianity. The AHA is launching its most expensive ad campaign during the Christmas season because this is a time of year atheists like to attack Christians, whether its renaming Christmas trees "holiday trees," forcing schools to rename Christmas parties "winter break" parties, or outlawing the display of Nativity scenes.

Perfect gift pack for the Christian patriot on your list -- Brad O'Leary's two new books, "America's War on Christianity" and "God and America's Leaders"

All religions, even the godless ones, are driven to recruit new members. But you don't see Christians attacking the Jewish faith during Hanukkah as a way to gain new followers. You don't see Jews seeking to expand popular appeal by publicly attacking Christians during Easter. Such a tactic, even if shamelessly couched as a way to get people to "think," could actually be considered a hate crime (under legislation passed by Congress) should AHA's advertising incite criminal activity against Christians, say, along the lines of the recent attempted bombing by a Muslim terrorist at a Christmas tree lighting ceremony in Portland, Ore.

Perhaps the most absurd defense of AHA's anti-Christian Christmas campaign comes from its sugar daddy, Mr. Stiefel.

"We must denounce politicians that contend U.S. law should be based on the Bible and the Ten Commandments," says Stiefel. "It has not been based on these and should never be. Our Founding Fathers created a secular democracy."

Actually, our American system of governance is deeply rooted in, and based on, the Judeo-Christian values practiced and cherished by our founders. Even a cursory study of American history reveals this to be true.

In fact, I just released a book titled "God and America's Leaders" that includes over 800 quotes by our Founding Fathers and past presidents that illustrate America's Christian heritage.

Since Stiefel and the AHA like quotes so much, perhaps they would be game for a little quiz:

Who said this? "The Bible contains the most profound Philosophy, the most perfect Morality, and the most refined Policy, that ever was conceived upon earth. It is the most Republican Book in the World, and therefore I will still revere it." (Hint: Founding Father)

Or this?

"I believe in one God, creator of the Universe. That He governs it by His Providence. That He ought to be worshipped. That the most acceptable Service we render to Him is doing good to His other Children. That the soul of man is immortal and will be treated with justice in another life respecting its conduct in this." (Hint: Another Founding Father).

Read More: